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11/15/2010 - Public Role in the Alcohol Licensing Process
 

Community meeting on the public role in the alcohol licensing process. 11/16/2010, 6-7:30p, C.V. Lib., 365 F St.

If you've ever wondered why there are so many liquor stores in your neighborhood, or why they always seem to get approved, you might be surprised to learn that it doesn't have to be that way!

Anyone can protest an alcohol license application, and community input is a valued and significant part of the process.

Join the South Bay Community Change Project staff for an informative workshop on the alcohol licensing process and how you can make a difference in reducing alcohol related problems in your community.

The workshop will be held on:

  • November 16, 2010
  • 6-7:30 p.m.
  • Chula Vista Public Library
  • 365 F Street

Although the California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) has final authority over the approval of alcohol license applications, local governments also have a say in the process under their land use and zoning authority. For example, if the proposed establishment will be located in a "high crime" area, or a region that already has a high number of alcohol-related businesses (bars, liquor stores, clubs, etc.) the local government must sign off on the application before it can be approved by ABC.

This usually involves a public hearing attended by representatives of the local police department, who provide crime statistics for the area around the proposed business.

City planners and local health officials may also weigh in, providing information about how the proposed business will fit in with the character of the neighborhood in which it is to be placed.

Finally, local residents, who may be affected by the new business, are also invited to give their input, and this is often a deciding factor.

In addition to participating in the local alcohol license review process, individuals may also protest license applications directly with ABC. Such protests often lead to license conditions that can reduce the negative impacts of alcohol sales and service on the community such as noise, traffic and alcohol-related crime.

License conditions may also address issues such as hours of operation, live entertainment,and requirements for private security presence.

Decades of research show that local control of alcohol establishments, such as restricting alcohol outlet density and placing conditions on business operation, is an effective strategy for reducing alcohol related problems such as traffic collisions, violence and other crime, and poor quality of life in our communities.

The alcohol license review process may seem complicated and daunting, but it ensures that the potential impact of a new alcohol business on the whole community is considered before the business can set up shop.

This process also helps to create a positive relationship between the business and its neighbors.

Funded by the County of San Diego, Health and Human Services Agency, Alcohol and Drug Services strategy for reducing alcohol related problems such as traffic collisions, violence and other crime, and poor quality of life in our communities.

The alcohol license review process may seem complicated and daunting, but it ensures that the potential impact of a new alcohol business on the whole community is considered before the business can set up shop. This process also helps to create a positive relationship between the business and its neighbors.

For more information contact:

  • Debbie Ramos at 619-476-9100 X305
  • South Bay Community Change Project
  • Institute for Public Strategies
  • 590 Third Avenue #204
  • Chula Vista, CA 91910

Funded by the County of San Diego, Health and Human Services Agency, Alcohol and Drug Services.


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